Alphabetic writing and the old georgian scripture

Versions of the New Testament Contents: This was certainly the best language for it to be written in; it was flexible and widely understood.

Alphabetic writing and the old georgian scripture

Versions of the New Testament Contents: This was certainly the best language for it to be written in; it was flexible and widely understood.

But not universally understood. In the west, there were many who spoke only Latin. In Egypt the native language was Coptic.

alphabetic writing and the old georgian scripture

And beyond the borders of the Roman Empire there were peoples who spoke even stranger languages -- Armenian, Georgian, Ethiopic, Gothic, Slavonic. In some areas it was the habit to read the scriptures in Greek whether people understood it or not.

But eventually someone had the idea of translating the scriptures into local dialects we now call these translations "versions". This was more of an innovation than we realize today; translations of ancient literature were rare.

The Septuagint translation of the Hebrew Bible was one of the very first. Despite the lack of translations in antiquity, it is effectively certain that Latin versions were in existence by the late second century, and that by the fourth there were also versions in Syriac and several of the Coptic dialects.

Versions in Armenian and Georgian followed, and eventually many other languages. The role of the versions in textual criticism has been much alphabetic writing and the old georgian scripture.

Since they are not in the original language, some people discount them because there are variants they simply cannot convey. But others note, correctly, that these versions convey texts from a very early date.

In many instances the text-types they represent survive very poorly or not at all in Greek. It is true that the versions often have suffered corruption of their own in the centuries since their translation. But such variants usually are of a nature peculiar to the version, and so can be gotten around.

When properly used, the versions are one of the best and leading tools of textual criticism. This essay does not attempt to fully spell out the history and limitations of the versions. These points will briefly be touched on, but the emphasis is on the textual nature of the versions.

Those who wish to learn more about the history of the versions are advised to consult a reference such as Bruce M. In the list which follows, the versions are listed in alphabetical order.

Of all the articles in this Encyclopedia, apart from those which touch on science and theology. But this one seems to make people most upset.

Please note that I am not setting out to belittle any particular version, and except in textual matters, I am not expert on these versions. I will stand by the statements on the textual affinities of the more important versions Latin, Syriac, Coptic; to a lesser extent, the Armenian, Georgian, and Gothic insofar as they are correctly incorporated into the critical apparatus.

For the history and such, I am dependent upon others. If you disagree with the information here, I will try to incorporate suggestions, but there is only so much I can do to make completely contradictory claims fit together Anglo-Saxon A name used for several translations, made independently and of very different types, used in Britain mostly before the Norman Conquest and of interest more to historians than textual scholars.

But since they are important for the understanding of early English literature they give us, among other things, important vocabulary referencesit seems worthwhile to at least mention them here, while understanding that what limited text-critical value they have is mostly for Vulgate criticism.

The Latin is from the seventh century; the interlinear is from the tenth. The decorated page containing John 1: And it would be centuries before Christianity completely took control of the island, because the German invaders immediately split the island into dozens of small states, of which seven survived to become the "Seven Kingdoms of Britain": To make matters worse, all these kingdoms had slightly different dialects.- Updated Daily - Print out daily news stories for friends, colleagues, students, family or co-workers!

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The Paleo-Hebrew alphabet (Hebrew: הכתב העברי הקדום ‬), also spelt Palaeo-Hebrew alphabet, is a variant of the Phoenician alphabet. Like the Phoenician alphabet, the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet contains 22 letters, all of which are consonants, and is described as an ph-vs.com term was coined by Solomon Birnbaum in ; he wrote, "To apply the term Phoenician to the script of the.

is and in to a was not you i of it the be he his but for are this that by on at they with which she or from had we will have an what been one if would who has her. The Paleo-Hebrew alphabet (Hebrew: הכתב העברי הקדום ‬), also spelt Palaeo-Hebrew alphabet, is a variant of the Phoenician alphabet.

Like the Phoenician alphabet, the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet contains 22 letters, all of which are consonants, and is described as an ph-vs.com term was coined by Solomon Birnbaum in ; he wrote, "To apply the .

alphabetic writing and the old georgian scripture

The history of writing traces the development of expressing language by letters or other marks and also the studies and descriptions of these developments.. In the history of how writing systems have evolved in different human civilizations, more complete writing systems were preceded by proto-writing, systems of ideographic or early mnemonic .

Biblical literature - Job | ph-vs.com